Leaf Print Process

My Leaf Prints on Paper process is now explained in full detail in a PDF Tutorial available for immediate download on my website. Discover the wonders of creating beautiful art using natural materials.

Leaf prints are a fun project for both children and adults. They are the ultimate in eco-friendly art. No dyes, inks or paints are used — just fallen leaves and paper. The colors and patterns of the leaves are transferred to the paper through steaming, and afterwards the leaves can be put into a compost pile.

LeafPrintPaper1

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9 Comments

  1. Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing this! I’ve had the hardest time finding out the how-tos of this process. All I’ve been able to find are pictures of the finished product and a few hints. It’s one of the art world’s best kept secrets! I’m excited to try it!

  2. Thank you for sharing your knowledge, I shall look forward to collecting leaves as they turn this Autumn. Have you tried this technique on fabrics? If so, were you successful / did you have to change any of the processes?

    1. Hi Penny! Yes, I do ecoprints on fabric. The protein fibers print really well — silk, wool and other animal fibers. The cellulose plant fibers are more difficult — cotton, linen, hemp and the like. I don’t use metal mordants, so I tend to get prints that are more faint. But there are other things you can try such as soaking the plant fiber first in soy milk or an alkaline like washing soda, soda ash, or baking soda.

      Other than that, the process is the same, except that I roll the fabric onto sticks if it’s a long piece, like a scarf. Then I wrap the bundle with string to give good contract between the leaves and the fabric.

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