A Passion for Trees

Hi Friends!

This has been a week of experimentation for me. I got the bug to do some leaf prints, and I had a new technique I wanted to try.

It’s not leaf season, but some trees do lose leaves in early spring. I found lots of Sycamore, Bauhinia, London Plane and Silk Oak leaves. I scavenged Coffeeberry and Toyon leaves from my yard trimmings. And I was lucky to find two small Redwood branches when I was at Manning Park in Montecito.

I had never printed with Redwood before, and wasn’t sure how it would turn out, if at all.

Cassandra Tondro, redwood leaf print“Redwood,” 14 x 11 inches, leaf print on watercolor paper

The technique I used was steaming the bundle of paper and leaves first, and then submerging it in a dye made from yellow onion skins. The onion skin dye gave them an interesting sepia tone. If you’d like to learn more about the leaf print process, check out my Introduction to Leaf Prints on Paper tutorial.

Cassandra Tondro, bauhinia leaf print“Bauhinia,” 14 x 11 inches, leaf print on watercolor paper

Cassandra Tondro, sycamore leaf print“Sycamore,” 11 x 14 inches, leaf print on watercolor paper

Cassandra Tondro, coffeeberry leaf print“Coffeeberry,” 14 x 11 inches, leaf print on watercolor paper

Cassandra Tondro, silk oak leaf print“Silk Oak,” 14 x 11 inches, leaf print on watercolor paper

I’m always amazed at the prints and colors from the leaves. These would look lovely framed and displayed as a group.

Cassandra Tondro leaf prints

What fuels your passion for experimentation? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments section below.

Wishing you all the joy that comes from a deep knowing of the Earth and all of her beloved beings.

Much love and appreciation,
Cassandra

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7 Comments

  1. Beautiful work Cassandra!
    I found your page while trying to discern if Bauhinia works as an eco print on fabric. Have you used it on fabric before and had success?
    Thank you.

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